artisans

‘Light High’ by Jacqueline Hen - International Light Art Award 2019

The 3rd International Light Art Award 2019, goes to Jacqueline Hen.

With her installation “Light High” she explores the human perception of time, space and possibly, the feeling of falling to other dimensions, that are unlike our 3D world.

Photo: Jacqueline Hen

Photo: Jacqueline Hen

Light, space are in an inseparable but invisible connection (theory of relativity). They presuppose a seemingly stable framework of orientation in everyday life, in which there is no reason to question the relationships between subject and object, cause and effect, beginning and end.

Photo: Frank Vinken

Photo: Frank Vinken

Photo: Jacqueline Hen

Photo: Jacqueline Hen

A mirrored ceiling together with a thin reflecting surface of water on the ground and a grid arrangement of lights are creating the spatial illusion of an infinite vertical space of light and darkness. By traversing a small bridge, the visitor can cautiously discover the immersing endlessness beneath his/her feats and above his/her head.

Photo: Jacqueline Hen

Photo: Jacqueline Hen

Photo: Jacqueline Hen

Photo: Jacqueline Hen

The installation is enhanced with the acoustic dimension of the Shepard sound. The Shepard scale is an acoustic illusion of a seemingly infinite rising or falling scale. To hear and experience “Light High” click on the video bellow:

Hiroto Yoshizoe's Moon Reflection

Inspired with the relationship between the moon and the sun, Yoshizoe's mobile called 1.625m/s2 reflects the light of one simple bulb via mirror.

1.625_moonsun_1_photo-by-Shunsuke-Watanabe.jpg
The moon is the most well-known indirect lighting known to humanity.
It receives light from the sun and gently shines above us, and is strongly associated with our feelings from ancient
times.
— Hiroto Yoshizoe
1.625_moonsun_2_photo-by-Shunsuke-Watanabe+(2).jpg

It consists of a series of suspended mirrors that reflect light to illuminate the surrounding space. If placed near window, it can also reflect light directly from the sun.

The mobile is called 1.625m/s2, which is the downwards acceleration caused by the moon's gravity on a falling body.

Just like the moon, this lighting equipment receives light from external environments and appears to shine gently to our eyes. The objects shine as they float within the air, as if they are free from gravity.
— Hiroto Yoshizoe
1.625_moonsun_7_photo-by-Shunsuke-Watanabe.jpg

Concept, Design: Hiroto Yoshizoe

Development: Kenichi Ochiai, Atsushi Muramatsu, Kentaro Watanabe, Masataka Honma, Hisato Hidaka, Eiichiro Imamura
Photo credits: Shunsuke Watanabe, Tolu Ando


Sources:

hirotoyoshizoe.com

dezeen.com

The Tapestry of Light

Royal Tapestry Factory in Madrid, founded in 1721, gets the makeover with innovative and fascinating new lighting.


Light & Studio designed lighting for this 4000 m2 property, inspired by the work of the ancient artisans who have gone through the workshops of the Royal Tapestry Factory of Madrid.

Its objective was the construction of a bridge between tradition and innovation, between the old and the new, a bridge that unites this factory working since 1721 and the coworking space for innovation companies that has been created between its walls, the Loom House.

The design is based on methacrylate tubes installed at different heights to create those crosses that resemble textile patterns. More than 200m of digital LED strips controlled point by point, run through these tubes making different scenes and tours, led by light.

It has been possible thanks to 3 controllers of 64 universes each, connected to a software made to measure for the project, images are launched in real time, generating different atmospheres.

The programming is integrated in a Dali system that allows to handle, through a touch screen, both the digital lighting and the rest of the lighting in the room. This system also allows adjusting the lighting to natural light that enters through the windows throughout the day to respect our biorhythms.