noir

The Movement of Air

Two brilliant french artists Adrien M / Claire B are creating dream-like scenography where dancers and light are performing choreography together. The performers are walking on the thin line between reality and virtual reality, where no rules of physics are applicable.

Photo: Romain Etienne / item

Photo: Romain Etienne / item

Other projects, like Pixel, are also showing their crazy skills to create light animation that interacts with dancers, seamlessly making the scene and performers as one.

Their latest viral project, Acqua Alta unfolds three times: a show mixing body and images; a book in pop-up to watch in augmented reality; an experience for virtual reality helmet.

Sources: www.am-cb.net

www.imimot.com

I Light Marina Bay festival 2019

From 28th of January until 24th of February was happening a sustainability-focused, Singapore-based spectacle i Light Marina Bay Festival. Following this years theme “Bridges of Time”, 32 sustainable light art installations and one multimedia show were presented.

The Floating Lighthouse by Milenko Prvački, Ryf Zaini and Dr. Robert Casteels  (Singapore)

The Floating Lighthouse by Milenko Prvački, Ryf Zaini and Dr. Robert Casteels (Singapore)

The Time Vortex by    Vendel & de Wolf   (The Netherlands)

The Time Vortex by Vendel & de Wolf (The Netherlands)

Lighthouse of Time by    Danny Rose   (France)

Lighthouse of Time by Danny Rose (France)

The Rainbow Connection by Yun  (Singapore)

The Rainbow Connection by Yun (Singapore)

Why Green? by    DP Architects    - Ng San Son, Bob Teo, Josiah Leong, Johann Lim, Jireh Lee, Theodore Goh, Shawn Teo, DP Lighting  (Singapore)

Why Green? by DP Architects - Ng San Son, Bob Teo, Josiah Leong, Johann Lim, Jireh Lee, Theodore Goh, Shawn Teo, DP Lighting (Singapore)

Facey Thing by    Uji Studios   (New Zealand)

Facey Thing by Uji Studios (New Zealand)

Prospegtive Perspective by Carnation Kng, Low Jo Ann and Justina Teng Yimin from    National University of Singapore   (Singapore)

Prospegtive Perspective by Carnation Kng, Low Jo Ann and Justina Teng Yimin from National University of Singapore (Singapore)

Shadow Exposed by    Judy K Suh    x    Visual Feeder   (USA)

Shadow Exposed by Judy K Suh x Visual Feeder (USA)

Sails Aloft by    Biangle Studio   (Estonia)

Sails Aloft by Biangle Studio (Estonia)

Shades of Temporality by    SWEATSHOPPE    - Blake Shaw and Bruno Levy  (USA)

Shades of Temporality by SWEATSHOPPE - Blake Shaw and Bruno Levy (USA)

Cosmic Web by Foo Hui Wen, Lim Yu Zhi and R.Yashini from    LASALLE College of the Arts   (Singapore)

Cosmic Web by Foo Hui Wen, Lim Yu Zhi and R.Yashini from LASALLE College of the Arts (Singapore)

Squiggle by    Angus Muir   (New Zealand)

Squiggle by Angus Muir (New Zealand)

City Gazing Singapore by    VOUW    - Mingus Vogel and Justus Bruns  (The Netherlands)

City Gazing Singapore by VOUW - Mingus Vogel and Justus Bruns (The Netherlands)

Les Footballeurs by    Rémi Brun   (France)

Les Footballeurs by Rémi Brun (France)

Time Traveller by Eko Prawoto  (Indonesia)

Time Traveller by Eko Prawoto (Indonesia)

Flower Clock by You Fan Zhou, Liao Qing Shuang, Guo Qian Ling, Song Le Jing and Lee Jian Wen from    Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts   (China)

Flower Clock by You Fan Zhou, Liao Qing Shuang, Guo Qian Ling, Song Le Jing and Lee Jian Wen from Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts (China)

The Cat in the Garden by    Loom Prod   (France)

The Cat in the Garden by Loom Prod (France)

Oriflammes by    Sebastien Lefevre   (France)

Oriflammes by Sebastien Lefevre (France)

TIME FRAME by    DONIS

TIME FRAME by DONIS

HALO by Michael Davis  (United Kingdom)

HALO by Michael Davis (United Kingdom)

Time Rhythm by    Xavi Bové    and    Onionlab   (Spain)

Time Rhythm by Xavi Bové and Onionlab (Spain)

Cenotaph for a Stone by Bryan Joseph Cadag, Loo Quan Le and Zulkarnain Bin Mohd Zin from    National University Singapore   (Singapore)

Cenotaph for a Stone by Bryan Joseph Cadag, Loo Quan Le and Zulkarnain Bin Mohd Zin from National University Singapore (Singapore)

Where do stories begin / Where do stories end by    Michael Lee    and    Perception3   (Singapore)

Where do stories begin / Where do stories end by Michael Lee and Perception3 (Singapore)

With A View by Superiore Design Associates - Ryan Linardy and Lim Cheng Jun  (Singapore)

With A View by Superiore Design Associates - Ryan Linardy and Lim Cheng Jun (Singapore)

Good Fortune by Olga Grybowicz and Kasper Hein  (Poland)

Good Fortune by Olga Grybowicz and Kasper Hein (Poland)

Run Beyond by    Angelo Bonello   (Italy)

Run Beyond by Angelo Bonello (Italy)

Land-pass Bird by Dr. Huang Chin-Fu  (Taiwan)

Land-pass Bird by Dr. Huang Chin-Fu (Taiwan)

Keys of Light by    Mr.Beam   (The Netherlands)

Keys of Light by Mr.Beam (The Netherlands)

Reflecting Holons by    Michiel Martens and Jetske Visser   (The Netherlands)

Reflecting Holons by Michiel Martens and Jetske Visser (The Netherlands)

Architecture. Rhythm. Shadow. Repeat.

I was so drawn into this type of visuals.

They make me wonder.

What is light without the shadow.

Is it a metaphor, feeling or maybe something not so abstract. Is it real.

Why do we strive for order, repetition, hierarchy.

What does the high contrast, rigidness and structure represent in our lives.

Do we feel safe there. Can we find something similar in nature.

Are we running away from it or is this something necessary in order to survive.

Photo:  i.pinimg.com


Light as a storyteller

Double Indemnity (1944)

Double Indemnity (1944)

Today we will go back in time and travel with the speed of light (heheh) (sorry)

I am fascinated how artists in the past who had limited technology and resources were able to express their talents and were telling the story within the art piece mostly with lighting. Lighting is able to create certain moods, atmosphere and character.

Even in written pieces, eg. Gustave Flaubert's Madam Bovary (1856.), the writer  is using lighting effects to symbolize specific situations or a character's psychology, while at the same time reflects a particular point of view. Not to mention how often the lighting is being used in poetry as a driver for expression of the feelings.

Akira(1988) is the perfect example for this. In this japanese ground breaking animated science fiction film, directed by Katsuhiro Otomo, neon light is used as a symbol for consumerism and it creates the dystopian feeling of the city which is very difficult to animate in every frame of the movie.


"No other film has ever looked like Akira, before or since. It’s stunningly fluid and detailed animation often required as many as 9 separate cel layers. The 125 minute feature was comprised of over 160,000 cels and almost as many backgrounds, each one completely hand–drawn and hand-painted." Joe Peacock, Akira cels collector 


Have a look at the short video on Akira: How to Animate Light



Another example is Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer sometimes referred as "The master of light"

The video bellow describes how in one of his paintings (Woman holding a balance 1662–1663) light draws you in and encompass the full scope of the painting.



And if you are interested how Film Noir  were made when the technology and resources were limited, and how talented people of the time made iconic look and feel in their movies, have a look at this video:


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