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Dan Flavin - Minimalist Master of Light

Using commercial fluorescent light tubing, Dan Flavin created light installations, making the spaces washed in vivid rainbow hues which became icons of Minimalism.

Dan Flavin 1971. - Untitled (to Janie Lee) Blue, pink, yellow and green fluorescent light  Photo:  flos.com

Dan Flavin 1971. - Untitled (to Janie Lee) Blue, pink, yellow and green fluorescent light

Photo: flos.com

His circa 50 years old light installations are shining bright today, still looking very contemporary.

Dan Flavin 1963. - The nominal three (to William of Ockham),  Photo:  tmlarts.com

Dan Flavin 1963. - The nominal three (to William of Ockham),

Photo: tmlarts.com

While outwardly simple and direct, these arrangements produce visual effects of surprising subtlety.

Dan Flavin 1966-1968. - Untitled (to the “innovator” of the Wheeling Peachblow)  Photo:  tmlarts.com

Dan Flavin 1966-1968. - Untitled (to the “innovator” of the Wheeling Peachblow)

Photo: tmlarts.com

His choice of the material was motivated in part by a desire to break free from both Abstract Expressionism and Pop art by seizing on the anonymous and industrial nature of a familiar commercial product.

Site-specific installation by Dan Flavin, 1996, Menil Collection

Site-specific installation by Dan Flavin, 1996, Menil Collection

One might not think of light as a matter of fact, but I do. And it is, as I said, as plain and open and direct an art as you will ever find.
— Dan Flavin

Hiroto Yoshizoe's Moon Reflection

Inspired with the relationship between the moon and the sun, Yoshizoe's mobile called 1.625m/s2 reflects the light of one simple bulb via mirror.

1.625_moonsun_1_photo-by-Shunsuke-Watanabe.jpg
The moon is the most well-known indirect lighting known to humanity.
It receives light from the sun and gently shines above us, and is strongly associated with our feelings from ancient
times.
— Hiroto Yoshizoe
1.625_moonsun_2_photo-by-Shunsuke-Watanabe+(2).jpg

It consists of a series of suspended mirrors that reflect light to illuminate the surrounding space. If placed near window, it can also reflect light directly from the sun.

The mobile is called 1.625m/s2, which is the downwards acceleration caused by the moon's gravity on a falling body.

Just like the moon, this lighting equipment receives light from external environments and appears to shine gently to our eyes. The objects shine as they float within the air, as if they are free from gravity.
— Hiroto Yoshizoe
1.625_moonsun_7_photo-by-Shunsuke-Watanabe.jpg

Concept, Design: Hiroto Yoshizoe

Development: Kenichi Ochiai, Atsushi Muramatsu, Kentaro Watanabe, Masataka Honma, Hisato Hidaka, Eiichiro Imamura
Photo credits: Shunsuke Watanabe, Tolu Ando


Sources:

hirotoyoshizoe.com

dezeen.com

The Tapestry of Light

Royal Tapestry Factory in Madrid, founded in 1721, gets the makeover with innovative and fascinating new lighting.


Light & Studio designed lighting for this 4000 m2 property, inspired by the work of the ancient artisans who have gone through the workshops of the Royal Tapestry Factory of Madrid.

Its objective was the construction of a bridge between tradition and innovation, between the old and the new, a bridge that unites this factory working since 1721 and the coworking space for innovation companies that has been created between its walls, the Loom House.

The design is based on methacrylate tubes installed at different heights to create those crosses that resemble textile patterns. More than 200m of digital LED strips controlled point by point, run through these tubes making different scenes and tours, led by light.

It has been possible thanks to 3 controllers of 64 universes each, connected to a software made to measure for the project, images are launched in real time, generating different atmospheres.

The programming is integrated in a Dali system that allows to handle, through a touch screen, both the digital lighting and the rest of the lighting in the room. This system also allows adjusting the lighting to natural light that enters through the windows throughout the day to respect our biorhythms.

‘Limbus Greenframe’ by Kauppi & Kauppi

Wouldn’t be great to work in the middle of a dense mini-jungle or to display your favorite plants in a different way? Swedish studio kauppi & kauppi brings us "Limbus Greenframe” project which is a minimalist wooden frame that celebrates potted plants and greenery.

I wanted to investigate how much a floor screen could be simplified, when everything except the naked elegant wood frame was reduced, I became interested in seeing what it could be filled with. I often long for the forest and have a beautiful norfolk pine at my desk, which always makes me happy
— Johan Kauppi
Perhaps my plants could fit in the frame? To make plants grow and prosper, light is needed. Glimakra of Sweden has great knowledge of wood production and did a great job when managed to integrate the lighting in the top of the frame and to conceal the technology in the frame itself. The result is a stripped and restrained furniture in solid wood, a mixture of a room divider, green furniture and light fixture.
— Johan Kauppi

Project info:

production: Glimakra of Sweden 
designer: Johan Kauppi 
animation, styling & music: Nina Kauppi 

Source: designboom.com

kauppikauppi.se

glimakra.com

RGB lighting installation at London Design Festival 2017

Vibrant blue and orange lights clash in this installation by Australian designer Flynn Talbot, which takes over the V&A's Prince Consort Gallery throughout the London Design Festival.

Orange lighting tubes have been installed at one end of the vaulted gallery, while matching blue lights have been positioned on the opposite end. Meanwhile, the long side walls have been covered up with rows of reflective black panels.

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