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Dan Flavin - Minimalist Master of Light

Using commercial fluorescent light tubing, Dan Flavin created light installations, making the spaces washed in vivid rainbow hues which became icons of Minimalism.

Dan Flavin 1971. - Untitled (to Janie Lee) Blue, pink, yellow and green fluorescent light  Photo:  flos.com

Dan Flavin 1971. - Untitled (to Janie Lee) Blue, pink, yellow and green fluorescent light

Photo: flos.com

His circa 50 years old light installations are shining bright today, still looking very contemporary.

Dan Flavin 1963. - The nominal three (to William of Ockham),  Photo:  tmlarts.com

Dan Flavin 1963. - The nominal three (to William of Ockham),

Photo: tmlarts.com

While outwardly simple and direct, these arrangements produce visual effects of surprising subtlety.

Dan Flavin 1966-1968. - Untitled (to the “innovator” of the Wheeling Peachblow)  Photo:  tmlarts.com

Dan Flavin 1966-1968. - Untitled (to the “innovator” of the Wheeling Peachblow)

Photo: tmlarts.com

His choice of the material was motivated in part by a desire to break free from both Abstract Expressionism and Pop art by seizing on the anonymous and industrial nature of a familiar commercial product.

Site-specific installation by Dan Flavin, 1996, Menil Collection

Site-specific installation by Dan Flavin, 1996, Menil Collection

One might not think of light as a matter of fact, but I do. And it is, as I said, as plain and open and direct an art as you will ever find.
— Dan Flavin

The Tapestry of Light

Royal Tapestry Factory in Madrid, founded in 1721, gets the makeover with innovative and fascinating new lighting.


Light & Studio designed lighting for this 4000 m2 property, inspired by the work of the ancient artisans who have gone through the workshops of the Royal Tapestry Factory of Madrid.

Its objective was the construction of a bridge between tradition and innovation, between the old and the new, a bridge that unites this factory working since 1721 and the coworking space for innovation companies that has been created between its walls, the Loom House.

The design is based on methacrylate tubes installed at different heights to create those crosses that resemble textile patterns. More than 200m of digital LED strips controlled point by point, run through these tubes making different scenes and tours, led by light.

It has been possible thanks to 3 controllers of 64 universes each, connected to a software made to measure for the project, images are launched in real time, generating different atmospheres.

The programming is integrated in a Dali system that allows to handle, through a touch screen, both the digital lighting and the rest of the lighting in the room. This system also allows adjusting the lighting to natural light that enters through the windows throughout the day to respect our biorhythms.

The Movement of Air

Two brilliant french artists Adrien M / Claire B are creating dream-like scenography where dancers and light are performing choreography together. The performers are walking on the thin line between reality and virtual reality, where no rules of physics are applicable.

Photo: Romain Etienne / item

Photo: Romain Etienne / item

Other projects, like Pixel, are also showing their crazy skills to create light animation that interacts with dancers, seamlessly making the scene and performers as one.

Their latest viral project, Acqua Alta unfolds three times: a show mixing body and images; a book in pop-up to watch in augmented reality; an experience for virtual reality helmet.

Sources: www.am-cb.net

www.imimot.com

I Light Marina Bay festival 2019

From 28th of January until 24th of February was happening a sustainability-focused, Singapore-based spectacle i Light Marina Bay Festival. Following this years theme “Bridges of Time”, 32 sustainable light art installations and one multimedia show were presented.

The Floating Lighthouse by Milenko Prvački, Ryf Zaini and Dr. Robert Casteels  (Singapore)

The Floating Lighthouse by Milenko Prvački, Ryf Zaini and Dr. Robert Casteels (Singapore)

The Time Vortex by    Vendel & de Wolf   (The Netherlands)

The Time Vortex by Vendel & de Wolf (The Netherlands)

Lighthouse of Time by    Danny Rose   (France)

Lighthouse of Time by Danny Rose (France)

The Rainbow Connection by Yun  (Singapore)

The Rainbow Connection by Yun (Singapore)

Why Green? by    DP Architects    - Ng San Son, Bob Teo, Josiah Leong, Johann Lim, Jireh Lee, Theodore Goh, Shawn Teo, DP Lighting  (Singapore)

Why Green? by DP Architects - Ng San Son, Bob Teo, Josiah Leong, Johann Lim, Jireh Lee, Theodore Goh, Shawn Teo, DP Lighting (Singapore)

Facey Thing by    Uji Studios   (New Zealand)

Facey Thing by Uji Studios (New Zealand)

Prospegtive Perspective by Carnation Kng, Low Jo Ann and Justina Teng Yimin from    National University of Singapore   (Singapore)

Prospegtive Perspective by Carnation Kng, Low Jo Ann and Justina Teng Yimin from National University of Singapore (Singapore)

Shadow Exposed by    Judy K Suh    x    Visual Feeder   (USA)

Shadow Exposed by Judy K Suh x Visual Feeder (USA)

Sails Aloft by    Biangle Studio   (Estonia)

Sails Aloft by Biangle Studio (Estonia)

Shades of Temporality by    SWEATSHOPPE    - Blake Shaw and Bruno Levy  (USA)

Shades of Temporality by SWEATSHOPPE - Blake Shaw and Bruno Levy (USA)

Cosmic Web by Foo Hui Wen, Lim Yu Zhi and R.Yashini from    LASALLE College of the Arts   (Singapore)

Cosmic Web by Foo Hui Wen, Lim Yu Zhi and R.Yashini from LASALLE College of the Arts (Singapore)

Squiggle by    Angus Muir   (New Zealand)

Squiggle by Angus Muir (New Zealand)

City Gazing Singapore by    VOUW    - Mingus Vogel and Justus Bruns  (The Netherlands)

City Gazing Singapore by VOUW - Mingus Vogel and Justus Bruns (The Netherlands)

Les Footballeurs by    Rémi Brun   (France)

Les Footballeurs by Rémi Brun (France)

Time Traveller by Eko Prawoto  (Indonesia)

Time Traveller by Eko Prawoto (Indonesia)

Flower Clock by You Fan Zhou, Liao Qing Shuang, Guo Qian Ling, Song Le Jing and Lee Jian Wen from    Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts   (China)

Flower Clock by You Fan Zhou, Liao Qing Shuang, Guo Qian Ling, Song Le Jing and Lee Jian Wen from Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts (China)

The Cat in the Garden by    Loom Prod   (France)

The Cat in the Garden by Loom Prod (France)

Oriflammes by    Sebastien Lefevre   (France)

Oriflammes by Sebastien Lefevre (France)

TIME FRAME by    DONIS

TIME FRAME by DONIS

HALO by Michael Davis  (United Kingdom)

HALO by Michael Davis (United Kingdom)

Time Rhythm by    Xavi Bové    and    Onionlab   (Spain)

Time Rhythm by Xavi Bové and Onionlab (Spain)

Cenotaph for a Stone by Bryan Joseph Cadag, Loo Quan Le and Zulkarnain Bin Mohd Zin from    National University Singapore   (Singapore)

Cenotaph for a Stone by Bryan Joseph Cadag, Loo Quan Le and Zulkarnain Bin Mohd Zin from National University Singapore (Singapore)

Where do stories begin / Where do stories end by    Michael Lee    and    Perception3   (Singapore)

Where do stories begin / Where do stories end by Michael Lee and Perception3 (Singapore)

With A View by Superiore Design Associates - Ryan Linardy and Lim Cheng Jun  (Singapore)

With A View by Superiore Design Associates - Ryan Linardy and Lim Cheng Jun (Singapore)

Good Fortune by Olga Grybowicz and Kasper Hein  (Poland)

Good Fortune by Olga Grybowicz and Kasper Hein (Poland)

Run Beyond by    Angelo Bonello   (Italy)

Run Beyond by Angelo Bonello (Italy)

Land-pass Bird by Dr. Huang Chin-Fu  (Taiwan)

Land-pass Bird by Dr. Huang Chin-Fu (Taiwan)

Keys of Light by    Mr.Beam   (The Netherlands)

Keys of Light by Mr.Beam (The Netherlands)

Reflecting Holons by    Michiel Martens and Jetske Visser   (The Netherlands)

Reflecting Holons by Michiel Martens and Jetske Visser (The Netherlands)

Architecture. Rhythm. Shadow. Repeat.

I was so drawn into this type of visuals.

They make me wonder.

What is light without the shadow.

Is it a metaphor, feeling or maybe something not so abstract. Is it real.

Why do we strive for order, repetition, hierarchy.

What does the high contrast, rigidness and structure represent in our lives.

Do we feel safe there. Can we find something similar in nature.

Are we running away from it or is this something necessary in order to survive.

Photo:  i.pinimg.com


Light Pollination

Light Pollination is an interactive digital artwork commissioned by iGuzzini to celebrate the power of light as a vehicle for social innovation and was designed by London-based digital-arts studio UniversalAssemblyUnit.


The installation seeks to spread the word about light, and in doing so, it explores the strong links between light and communication. Fibre optic, the primary material used to create the artwork, is a vehicle for light through which high-speed communication is facilitated. Thus, the art installation is both an expression and a prototype of this, albeit on a smaller scale. Rather than addressing a particular function, it imagines an alternative way of interacting with artificial light.

Photo:    Dezeen

Photo: Dezeen

"We were interested in how we could create a light behaviour that was responsive to human interaction," Lee explains.

"You can use your phone or any light source to influence these trails of light that flow across the surface. Depending on the light intensity that you're feeding it, that will define how big a reaction it's going to have."

The installation is powered by custom-built software that Universal Assembly Unit developed in-house.

"The challenge for us was to find a way to control so many points of light, Lee says. "The software takes the information from the sensors and then create these turbulence fields that disturb the trails of light."

Photo:    Dezeen

Photo: Dezeen

Photo:    Dezeen

Photo: Dezeen

First luminaire with integrated Li-Fi revealed

li-fi.jpg

What’s Li-fi?

Li-fi can perform around 100 times faster than Wi-fi, which would mean you could download the entire set of Star Wars movies in around one second. Photo:    purelifi.com

Li-fi can perform around 100 times faster than Wi-fi, which would mean you could download the entire set of Star Wars movies in around one second. Photo: purelifi.com

Li-fi is a way of transmitting data – including the internet – to devices such as smart phones using visible light from LEDs pulsed at high frequency.

The luminaire

Ores – the world’s first integrated luminaire which can deliver the internet using light. Photo:    purelifi.com

Ores – the world’s first integrated luminaire which can deliver the internet using light. Photo: purelifi.com

The new luminaire – developed by Scottish start-up pureLiFi and French light fitting manufacturer Lucibel – places all the necessary Li-Fi components in a black ring that lies flat against the ceiling and is designed to circle an LED light. It is able to support between eight to 16 users at once, and deliver data at rates of 45 megabits per second.

How does it work?

The pureLiFi dongle is set to shrink in size, but the plan is to, ultimately make it obsolete. Photo:    purelifi.com

The pureLiFi dongle is set to shrink in size, but the plan is to, ultimately make it obsolete. Photo: purelifi.com

It's bi-directional, unlike so-called visual light communication, or VLC, in which information is broadcast in one direction to devices.

The lights are pulsed at extremely high frequencies which is undetectable to the human eye. It operates at many hundreds of times faster than high-frequency lighting power supplies or ballasts which are used today.

Devices can download information in two ways:

  1. It can use the forward-facing camera on your smart phone or laptop. In truth, the components required to deploy this technology are much simpler than Wi-fi or Bluetooth. Think about how many devices already have some sort of light-sensing capability to enable functions such as automatic screen dimming.

  2. Alternatively, a plug-in dongle with built-in photo-receptor receives the information.

The luminaire transmitting the data still needs to connect to the internet or network. This could be with an Ethernet connection or using power-line communication, which is basically data sent over conventional mains wiring. Li-fi engineers say the best solution is to have the whole installation as a Power over Ethernet installation, where both power and data is sent along Cat 5 or Cat 6 cables.

Ores is set to be unveiled at LuxLive 2017 in London in November, its developers have announced. LuxLive 2017 takes place at ExCeL London on Wednesday 15 November and Thursday 16 November. Entry is free if you pre-register HERE.

Sorces: luxreview.com purelifi.com

"Voice for Light"

No, that’s not some crazy Dyson fan pictured at the top of this post. It’s the future of lighting and it’s called the GE Sol Wifi Connected Smart Light Fixture. This awesome futuristic lamp has adjustable color temperature, touch controls, and mood settings, and it can even be controlled from your smartphone.. Automations and scenes are also supported, but the cherry on top is the built-in Alexa controls. Just like an Echo or an Echo Dot, the Sol lamp can use Alexa to answer all your questions, place orders on Amazon, or even control your smart home gadgets...

via BGR

Ge's futuristic Sol is the first smart lamp with Alexa...

Photo:    http://bgr.com

Interested to see more ? Visit https://www.cbyge.com/

and find out much more...