Inspiration: FontanaArte

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FontanaArte is an Italian lighting brand founded in Milan in 1932 by Luigi Fontana & Gio Ponti. In just over thirty years FontanaArte became the most outstanding company specialized in the use of glass in lighting and furnishings, and also remarkable for its modern design and perfect craftsmanship.

This great success was owed to the three artistic directors who guided the company: Gio Ponti, memorable for being the first to have intuited the immense potential of glass applied to new lighting systems and furnishings. Pietro Chiesa, the true supporter of the worldwide success of the brand, a man of exceptional artistic culture, able to move between the most avant-garde modernism and the purest, most refined decoration. Max Ingrand, who joined Fontana Arte after Chiesa’s death and the end of the First World War, and brought FontanaArte back to life, updating its productions and leading it into the design world as we conceive it today even though he never betrayed the inheritance of the masters who preceded him.

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Photos: louisamydesign.wordpress.com

Plan your space with lasers

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Epic FX is a company with amazing ideas. Have a look at their project for Brookfield's DesignHive. They created a simple way to visualise various furniture configurations in a large space using lasers. They also developed a custom iOS application that allows anyone to easily control the system from their iPad or iPhone. Check out the video below for a look at the space.

 

Also, have a look at the video of LED drone they created! (volume down)

Bluetooth mesh lighting control

Photo:    luxreview.com

Bluetooth mesh is new Bluetooth technology and is different from what people use in their phones. It is suitable for small buildings, lighting systems, fire alarm devices and sensors.

It is a wireless network of many devices connected to each other capable forwarding messages back and forward.

Bluetooth mesh transforms Bluetooth from a typical point-to-point, star-based network into a true mesh networking topology. If you have a device within range of another device on such a network, the range of both devices is extended. Keep on adding nodes, and the range keeps extending.

While mesh networking is nothing new, it is only now starting to be adopted by leading luminaire manufacturers.

Bluetooth mesh will make the lighting control 'box' redundant, says Simon Slupik, the chief technology officer of Silvair and chair of the Bluetooth mesh group. "That box – when you think about it – is a computer with software. We’re simply putting a copy of that software in every light."

Bluetooth is handling global standardisation for lighting control application. That basically mean that consumer can buy luminaries from different manufacturers and they will be compatible with each other.

Range of the mesh is as far as it needs to be, the whole building or collection of buildings  because it is not limited to a radio range.  In terms of the range between devices is hundreds of meters.

This system is, to some extents available today - there are manufacturers that implemented Bluetooth antennae in their lighting fittings and can be controlled with app on your phone.

Photo:    ledinside.com

Even though the main application is for the lighting control, in the future it is expected to broaden its field to smart buildings - collecting data from wireless sensors and using that data to drive automated processes and systems in the building.

Sources:

Luxreview.com

ledsmagazine.com

ledinside.com

nordicsemi.com

Explosive Light-Based Installations by Adela Andea

The Romanian-born artist, who is based in Houston, uses lighting technology with a focus on LED light - for vibrant installations that recreate scenes from nature in the age of climate change.

Andea looks to bioluminescent sea life, melting icebergs, and cosmological events to shape the composition and meaning of her large-scale installations.

The pieces appears as lit explosions, with LED lights, magnifying lenses, and flex neon springing outwards in a blend of chaos and control.

"The numerous transitions in my life made me think about the enormous capability of people to adapt to situations and even more, search for the new possibilities of personal development through inquisitive experiences. I strive for my art to vindicate the malign consequences of technology on the environment and inspire new exciting ways to infuse technology."

Vista of Light by Andrew W Rae

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Andrew W Rae created a 2500m² bespoke audio visual installation for Christmas at Blenheim 2017 on behalf of creative light and sound art company; Ithaca. Visitors were invited to take an immersive walk up the hill and through trees featuring over 8,000 pixel mapped LED spheres and two 20 metre high trees wrapped in 500m metres of pixel mapped LED lighting.

There's not much more to say except to enjoy the video below:

Lumiere London light festival 2018 - in pictures

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Waterlicht, by Dutch artist Daan Roosegaarde, offers the illusion of being under a sea of deep blue waves, bringing “the power and poetry of water” to the shadows of Regent’s. https://www.instagram.com/p/BeQQ3zenX-I/?tagged=lumierelondon

Northern Lights, by Swedish artist Aleksandra Stratimirovic, channels the Aurora Borealis in Grosvenor Square.


Members of the public interact with Illumaphonium by Michael Davis


People play on Impulse by Lateral Office and CS Design. Having run since 2009 when it was first held in Durham, Lumiere was last year attended by 1.3 million people in London.

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Love Motion by Rhys Coren in the Royal Academy courtyard. This is a Matisse-inspired animation of two dancing paper-cut figures projected onto the facade of the RA, accompanied by music


Spectral, by Katarzyna Malejka and Joachim Slugocki in St James’s Square. This will be Lumiere’s second year in London, following a barnstorming first impression in 2016


A work by by Stéphane Masson, on St James Market near Regent Street. The work consists of lots of small mason jars with screens behind to project images through them in time to music

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Stranger installations include an iconic London telephone box converted into a fish tank in Seven Dials. Aquarium by artists Benedetto Bufalino and Benoit Deseille

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Entre Les Rangs by Rami Bebawi/KANVA

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Director of Artichoke and Artistic Director of Lumiere London Helen Marriage says Lumiere aims to transform the usually hectic nightscape of London into a giant, outdoor art gallery

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Members of the public watch Voyage by Camille Gross and Leslie Epsztein in Piccadilly Circus. Marriage says Lumiere taps into people’s desire for the ‘be there or you’ve missed it’ moment, adding that in an age when we spend much of our time staring at screens, ‘standing in a crowd, sharing a moment, is really important’


Lightbench by Bernd Spiecker for LBO LichtBankObjekte

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Harmonic Portal by Chris Plant in St James Church, Piccadilly. The festival is integrated into the Visit London app, which will help visitors keep track of all 58 installations

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Reflektor by Studio Roso in St James’s Market


Nightlife by the Lantern Company with Jo Pocock in Leicester Square

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Lampounette by TILT


Trafalgar Square, Child Hood from Collectif Coin, co-produced by La Casemate

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The Light of the Spirit Chapter 2 by Patrice Warrener projected on to Westminster Abbey’s West Front. The work highlights sculptural details in bright colours

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People walk through The Wave by Vertigo on the Riverside Walkway, South Bank

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Source: theguardian.com

Explore how bright your city is at night with these interactive maps

Photo:    NASA

Photo: NASA

Recently I was reading about light pollution and that inspired me to explore the world view from the space at night. This is how I found out about this most up to date interactive map from NASA:

nasa worldview 2016

I love this map because it can show you information from every day (ehm night) throughout 2016, has layers that can be turned on/off and you can even create animations with it!

If you like simple maps or you're curious to go back in time a little so that you can compare how it was eg. in 2012. and 2010. you can check these below:

blue-marble.de 2015

blue-marble.de 2012

blue-marble.de 2010

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There is a visual difference between maps. The map from 2010 is created with night-lights mosaic pictures and relied on technology from the 1970s. NASA lunched new satellite in 2011 and beautified images by coloring them. This is how 2012 map is created. While NASA's picture shows even villages' lights, subtle differences in cities were lost. Hence the 2015 map is created.

Next map is in the form of globe with some additional options. The only flaw - there is no information from what year it is.

nightearth.com

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And for the end - live map of where it is daytime, twilight or night time: Twilight map

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Light Pollination

Light Pollination is an interactive digital artwork commissioned by iGuzzini to celebrate the power of light as a vehicle for social innovation and was designed by London-based digital-arts studio UniversalAssemblyUnit.


The installation seeks to spread the word about light, and in doing so, it explores the strong links between light and communication. Fibre optic, the primary material used to create the artwork, is a vehicle for light through which high-speed communication is facilitated. Thus, the art installation is both an expression and a prototype of this, albeit on a smaller scale. Rather than addressing a particular function, it imagines an alternative way of interacting with artificial light.

Photo:    Dezeen

Photo: Dezeen

"We were interested in how we could create a light behaviour that was responsive to human interaction," Lee explains.

"You can use your phone or any light source to influence these trails of light that flow across the surface. Depending on the light intensity that you're feeding it, that will define how big a reaction it's going to have."

The installation is powered by custom-built software that Universal Assembly Unit developed in-house.

"The challenge for us was to find a way to control so many points of light, Lee says. "The software takes the information from the sensors and then create these turbulence fields that disturb the trails of light."

Photo:    Dezeen

Photo: Dezeen

Photo:    Dezeen

Photo: Dezeen

Mesmerizing Kaleidoscopic Glass Installations by Olafur Eliasson

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With a focus on light and perspective, Olafur Eliasson’s installations have a transformative capacity that allows the viewer to experience the illusion of a supernatural environment.

Danish-Icelandic artist, who is based in Copenhagen and Berlin, often uses mirrors, tinted glass, stainless steel frames, and lightbulbs to create spectacular kaleidoscopic works that transform spaces into illuminated, multicolored realms of beauty.

“I often work with geometric shapes and with non-Euclidean geometry,” Eliasson explains. “It is very much about movement and time, because each polyhedron has an LED light at its centre, and when you walk around beneath the artwork, light sparkles through the cracks in the frames above, so that the viewer is instrumental in making a composition of light in transformation. It is like a sound composition, only there is no sound.”

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